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Design Table III - Jake Oliver-Fishman

£ 1,400.00
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Artist: Jake Oliver-Fishman
Medium: Artwork on table - one of a kind design.
Size: 59 W x 105 L x 40 H cm
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The Wondering Collection - An Exploration of Colour Through the Use of Black
Jake has a background rooted in sculpture, installation and performance, all of which now partake in feeding his practice as a painter. Paintings are produced using just black ink, white pigment, and clear carrier liquids to transport his inks across the acrylic glass he works on. The process begins with a structure being made for the acrylic glass to be laid on. Given the flexible nature of the glass, a landscape is created where hills and troughs dictate the initial movement of the inks. The clear carrier liquids act as a catalyst to the black inks. The molecules of the different colours within the inks are attracted to the carrier liquids at varying degrees. As the liquids make their journey across the acrylic glass, the individual colours that make up the blacks therefore move at different speeds. It is this reaction that enables Jake to gradually tease out the unique colours that make up each different black. The scientific reaction is known as Chromatography. The name comes from the Greek words chroma and graph, for ‘colour writing’, a technique first developed in 1910 by Russian botanist Mikhail Tsvet, as a means of separating the pigments that make up plant dyes. Through heating or cooling parts of the liquids, while repeatedly adjusting the heights of different areas of the acrylic glass, Jake has managed to bring an element of control to an otherwise chaotic event. It is this dance between that which can be tamed and the uncontrollable, that has resulted in Jake becoming totally immersed with this approach to creating work. Given the partially translucent nature of the paintings, they interact with their environment. The wall becomes part of the piece and the surrounding light affects the shadows cast by the painting.
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